Chef Roy Choi and the Street Food Remix

Chef Roy Choi and the Street Food Remix
by Jacqueline Briggs Martin and June Jo Lee
Illustrated by Man One

Readers Theater

Book Trailer

Author Interview – Martin

Author Interview – Lee

Illustrator Interview

Related Activities & Resources:

Informational Resources:

Author Information:

Jacqueline Briggs Martin Biography:
http://www.jacquelinebriggsmartin.com/about/index.html

Jacqueline Briggs Martin Blog:
http://jacquelinebriggsmartin.blogspot.com/

June Jo Lee Biography:
http://www.readerstoeaters.com/our-story/

Interview with June Jo Lee:
http://nwasianweekly.com/2017/06/local-publisher-readers-to-eaters-debut-childrens-book-chef-roy-choi-and-the-street-food-remix/

Illustrator Information:

Interview with Man One:
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/latino/latino-muralist-man-one-s-list-8-graffiti-artists-follow-n616391

Man One Biography:
http://www.manone.com/bio/

Activities & Resources:

Activities:

Cooking:

Making dumplings:
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/202975/potstickers-chinese-dumplings/?internalSource=hub%20recipe&referringContentType=search%20results&clickId=cardslot%201

Recipes for picky eaters:
https://www.bettycrocker.com/menus-holidays-parties/mhplibrary/recipes/30-easy-dinners-kids-will-devour

Cooking with kids:
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/packages/recipes-for-kids/cooking-with-kids

Korean Cooking with Maangchi:
https://www.maangchi.com/

Korean Cooking with JinJoo:
https://kimchimari.com/

Korean BBQ with JinJoo:
https://kimchimari.com/bulgogi-korean-beef-bbq/

Community:

Have students come together to brainstorm ideas to help improve a community issue. Students can work together to put one of the ideas into play.

Have each student create a piece of art that represents either their culture or a culture they admire. Display all pieces together as a collective work of art.

Have students create a list of acts of kindness that they will pledge to accomplish by a set amount of time.

Have students use online resources and personal experiences to create a list of food trucks in the nearby area. Include the name of the food truck, known locations, and at least three positive reviews for each.

Culture:

Invite students to come in traditional dress from their culture. Have students talk about their outfit and explain the relevance of each piece. Students can ask questions and share information.

Have students bring a favorite dish from their culture to share with the group. Have a potluck and discuss the importance of each dish coming together to make a full meal much like each student contributes to making a group of learners.

Graffiti:

Kiddle search and information about Graffiti:
https://kids.kiddle.co/Graffiti

Video to create graffiti names (11:35):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQbicrvJ5zs

Roy Choi:

Kogi food truck website:
http://kogibbq.com/

About Chef Roy Choi:
http://kogibbq.com/about-chef-roy/

MakerSpace Activities:

Plan a segment for a cooking show. Include a script, cast list, and cue cards. Also, create a list of props that would be needed to video the segment.

Make a video of your cooking show segment.

Have students create an ad for a food truck. Include the name of the food truck, menu, and a slogan.

Have students use makerspace station materials to build a model of a food truck complete with pretend dishes.

Discussion Questions:

Does your family have any special recipes for dishes that are unique to your heritage? What are they? Explain.

Have you ever felt like you didn’t belong? If so, what did you do? If not, how would you help a friend who feels this way?

What is your favorite food? Why?

If you could cook for Chef Roy Choi, what special meal would you want to share with him? Why?

Roy’s family gathered each day at 3 PM for “Dumpling Time” in which they all helped make dumplings. Does your family have any special scheduled events each day? Explain.

Chef Roy Choi feels a great love for his mother and her support. Is there a family member for whom you feel the same? Why?

Roy was watching a cooking show when he realized what he wanted to be. Do you have an idea of what you want to be? If so, what made you decide this? If not, what are some ideas you might consider?

Would you like to cook for a thousand people in one night? Why?

Have you ever had Korean BBQ tacos? Where? What did you think of them? Explain. If not, would you want to try them? Why or why not?

If you had to work in a restaurant, which would you prefer- a fancy up-scale place or a taco truck? Why?

Would you enjoy having a Locol restaurant across the street from your school? Why?

If you could open any type of restaurant, what would it be? Why?

Would you want to open a restaurant with your family? Why?

Think about your culture. What is one thing you would not ever want to change about it? Why?

There are many different cultures in the world. What is one about which you would really like to learn? Explain.

What is something in your community that is special to you? Why?

If you could change one thing in your community, what would it be? How would you suggest changing it?

What did you think of the art style of this book? Explain.

Some consider graffiti art; whereas others view it as destruction of property. With which side do you agree? Why?

Do you have a favorite artist? Who is it? Why? If not, explain any art form you admire and why you feel this way.

Book Talk Teasers:

Read the Readers Theater for this book..

Have you ever worried about what you will be when you grow up? Where you will fit in? Who you will be? Roy Choi grew up feeding on his mother’s “sohn-mash”, the love and cooking talent she put into all of her food. This flavor helped him discover a true talent in creating delicious food to be enjoyed by all.

Read Alikes:

Food Books–Cookbooks

Brennan, Georgeanne. Green eggs and ham cookbook. Recipes inspired by the characters and stories of Dr. Seuss. (Novelist).

Crespo, Clare. The secret life of food. Provides forty-six whimsical recipes for children, including tarantula cookies, spaghetti with eyeballs, sushi cupcakes, mutant chicken, and potato flip-flops. (Novelist).

Dahl, Roald. Roald Dahl’s revolting recipes. Offers simple, step-by-step recipes for dishes mentioned in Roald Dahl’s works, including such delicacies as “Bruce Bogtrotter’s Sensational Chocolate Cake” and “Stinkbug Eggs”. (Novelist).

Ray, Rachael. Cooking rocks! The Food Network hostess presents a collection of age-specific recipes for children, using letters, drawings, and recipes from her fans to present them. (Novelist).

Walker, Barbara M. The Little House cookbook. Recipes based on the pioneer food written about in the “Little House” books of Laura Ingalls Wilder, along with quotes from the books and descriptions of the food and cooking of pioneer times. (Novelist).

How-to Books

Ibbs, Katharine. DK children’s cookbook. Presents illustrated explanations of cooking terms, equipment, techniques, preparation tips, advice on healthy eating, and more than fifty recipes. (Novelist).

New junior cookbook. Includes recipes with detailed instructions for making breakfasts, snacks, sandwiches, main dishes, and desserts. (Novelist).

Wilkes, Angela. Children’s quick & easy cook book. Discusses cooking techniques, food hygiene, and kitchen safety, and presents step-by-step instructions for all types of dishes. (Novelist).

Review:

Martin, Jacqueline Briggs and June Jo Lee.  Illustrated by Man One. Chef Roy Choi and the Street Food Remix.  Readers to Eaters, 2017.  hb isbn 978-0983661597 School Library Journal (May 1, 2017)
Gr 1-5-Spicy, sweet, colorful, tangy-all the words that authors Martin and Lee use to describe Roy Choi’s Korean Mexican cuisine apply just as accurately to the book they’ve created along with L.A. street artist Man One. Choi’s parents came to the United States from Korea when he was two years old, opening a family restaurant in Los Angeles. After stints as an aimless street kid and a cooking school-trained chef, he combined his local knowledge, Korean heritage, and chef skills to open a taco truck, serving Korean barbecued short ribs wrapped in corn tortillas and loaded with Roy’s “awesome sauce.” One truck turned into many, which led to his first stationary restaurant, Locol, in the Watts neighborhood of L.A. Choi’s dedication to bringing wholesome, flavorful fast food to low-income neighborhoods is reflected in every word and stroke of this colorful book. The jaunty text has the rhythm of a griot’s story (“What? Chefs cook in kitchens, not on trucks!”) without sacrificing readability. Graffiti tags and airbrushed landscapes are the background for energetically warped cartoon illustrations. Lots of diagonals and brilliant colors capture the speed and flavor of street food served hot. One particularly effective sequence juxtaposes Choi in his chef’s whites garnishing a plate of lamb chops with Choi, wearing headphones and a backward baseball cap, scratching a record while mixing up “awesome sauce” on the following page. In both spreads, the focus is on his skilled hands, the concentration evident on his face. If you’re not hungry already, this savory array of sizzling words and art will make your mouth water. VERDICT This excellent picture book biography about an inventive chef doing good belongs on all shelves.-Paula Willey, Baltimore County Public Library, Towson © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.  Reprinted with permission from School Library Journal , 2017.

 

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